Aiping Lu

Aiping Lu,

MD

Senior Scientist

Dr. Aiping Lu, MD is Senior Scientist at the Center for Regenerative Sports Medicine (CRSM). Prior to joining CRSM/SPRI, Dr. Lu was assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston for the past 4 years. Currently, Dr. Lu works closely with Dr. Johnny Huard and involves all the NIH funded projects at CRSM.  Dr. Lu’s main areas of research are muscle stem cell biology and applications. Characterization and transplantation of muscle stem cells for alleviating muscular degeneration associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the phenotypic changes associated with natural aging and progeria.

Dr. Lu’s research in the past 18 years has been focusing on stem cell therapy for skeletal muscle disorders, injury and aging.  Dr. Lu have extensive knowledge in the areas of stem cell therapy, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine applications based on the use of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). The MDSCs isolated from human are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of urinary stress incontinence and myocardial infarction. As of this date, more than 300 women in Canada and the U.S. have volunteered for this stem cell therapy.

Since 2006, Dr. Lu have published more than 30 papers including first, co-authored and corresponding authored peer reviewed articles. Dr. Lu was involved in many NIH funded projects as a co-investigator. Most importantly, Dr. Lu was awarded NIH R21 grant entitled “Effects of Circulating Factors and Progenitors on Wound Healing during Pregnancy” (NIH R21 AR073509-01, 06/01/18 – 05/31/20) as Multi-PI and she has been leading this project. Additionally, Dr. Lu have been training many medical students, graduate students, postdocs and clinical fellows for 18 years in United States.

Dr. Lu and her husband moved to Fort Collins in the beginning of August 2019.  They would like to enjoy the weather and looking forward to getting more funding support for their research in Colorado.
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